Hi! I'm a taxidermist.
To me, Nature is God. Without it, we simply would not exist. Conserving the world’s natural spaces and the creatures that live there is paramount to the survival of humans as a species, and I have therefore dedicated my life to studying environmentalism in order to help people co-exist more successfully and sustainably with the natural world.

All natural materials I use in my creations are either sourced from roadkill, Fish and Game, secondhand sources such as fellow artists and estate sales, or are antique. In this way, I'm ensuring that no animals were needlessly killed for the sake of the artwork I produce. I fully believe that no part of any creature should go to waste if a purpose can be found for it, but I do NOT support trophy hunters or overseas fur farms by buying 'byproducts' like bones, skulls, or claws directly from them. The only exception I make for this rule is for parts from animals legally culled for population control programs approved by Fish and Wildlife.

As a photographer and wildlife enthusiast, I've been involved with many fantastic organizations such as Images4Life and Wild Tiger, as well as the Sierra Club and many smaller, local groups.
I've been published, interviewed, and even featured on Rainn Wilson (Dwight from “The Office”)'s personal networking website, SoulPancake.com.

I’ve also been blessed with the opportunity to visit many of the world’s most amazing wild places, like Komodo Island, Bali, Lombok, Malaysia, and the Cayman Islands, and have even documented entirely new species previously unknown to science.

Other interests include: Wilderness survival, primitive skills, backpacking, fishing, kayaking, boffing, airsoft, snowboarding, meandering around town, and caving.

 

Cheetah lickin’ her chops. Oregon Zoo. Image by NaturePunk. 

Cheetah lickin’ her chops. Oregon Zoo. Image by NaturePunk. 

cinemagorgeous:

Before They Pass Away. Photographer Jimmy Nelson traveled around the earth to try and document the world’s most secluded tribes. 

(Source: cinemagorgeous)

slobbermonsters:

Saw this handsome pup at the dog park today, owners insist that he’s a “wolf/husky hybrid.”  I saw him about a year ago and the husband was very proud of his “98% wolf” that he paid a lot of money for.  Pretty sure he’s the guy I almost got in a huge fight with when I said his dog didn’t look like a wolf, much less a high content wolfdog, but I’m not sure.  Didn’t feel like restarting that battle today, so I didn’t say anything.

  • The fact that he came in, happily visited every single person, and was playing with a Chihuahua is kind of a big clue that he’s not a wolfdog.  But I phenotyped him anyway for some of the people there that were curious after the owners left.
  • Pure white coat (not the same as an Arctic’s coat), comparatively thin coat too.
  • Curled tail, held over his back when he was running.
  • Partial snow nose
  • Blue eye (pretty sure one of his eyes was blue)
  • Thin, pointed ears set pretty far apart on the head.
  • Smaller head with a fairly defined stop.
  • Small paws, can’t remember what color his nails were, but pretty sure some of them were clear.
  • The only possible wolf traits he has are long legs, narrow chest, and a little bit of cheek ruffs.  But all of those are also ambiguous traits and they can’t possibly outweigh the vast amount of dog traits.

I see Siberian Husky and maybe some White/Swiss Shepherd. 

Non- Wolfdogs & Naturepunk & anyone else: how’d I do?

Great job on the phenotype! I also notice that the paws are compact little husky paws (instead of the long-toed wolf paws often seen in wolfdogs).

Obviously, this is another case of misrepresentation, as the animal in question doesn’t even appear to be a low-content, let alone a “98% wolf!” He looks like an Alaskan husky. 

asylum-art:

Angela Rizza Illustration

Artist onTumblr | Facebook | on deviantART |on Behance

Angela Rizza is a freelance artist and illustrator based in New York. She graduated with her BFA in 2011 from the Fashion Institute of Technology and loves illustrating narrative works and characters. Since graduating she has been featured in Level magazine, Imagine FX, Creative Quarterly, Illustration Age, and has done shows for Light Grey Art Lab, and has worked with Bioware. Let’s take a look at some of her artworks.

mushing1:

| Mmmm reindeer antlers.. #snack #greenlanddog #grønlandshund #miki #adventdalen #svalbard #spitsbergen 
helgabkr | instagram

mushing1:

Mmmm reindeer antlers.. #snack #greenlanddog #grønlandshund #miki #adventdalen #svalbard #spitsbergen 

helgabkr | instagram

nikkiifool:

lastofthetimeladies:

freshest-tittymilk:

portraits-of-america:

     “I got both of them from local shelters. When I got her in 2006, the staff told me she was a shepherd husky. I go to the dog park, I’m meeting people with shepherd husky mixes, and they look nothing like her. I get in my car, I’m driving, I look in the rearview mirror, I see these eyes and I’m like, I’ve got a wolf in my car. Then, when she was 10-months old, there was a shepherd breeder and trainer in the dog park, and at the end of the lesson, the trainer came up to me and asked, ‘What kind of dog is that?’ And I’m thinking, Shepherd husky. You should know, you are a breeder. She said, ‘That’s a wolf.’”  
Bethlehem, PA

Thats mildly hilarious

#OH MY GOD#THEY SOLD HER A FUCKING WOLF#THATS SO GODDAMN DANGEROUS#WHAT THE HELL HOW DO YOU EVEN FUCK UP THAT BADLY

what do you think of this naturepunk ?

Already re-blogged this, but it’s apparently making the rounds again. This is a classic case of “well, if it doesn’t look exactly like a purebred shepherd/husky is *must* be a wolf!” 
Neither of these animals appear to have any wolf content whatsoever. Their body structure and skull size are doglike; their ears, noses, eyes, and jowls are all dog, too; lastly, their easy nature in a public space is likewise an indication these two pups are “just” dogs.  
Rescuing a wolfdog is not easy - I know this story intimately. Woofers don’t adjust well when separated from the people who raise them, and do not transition nicely into new homes. If not raised around people, in a stable environment, they quickly revert to feral behaviors and are virtually impossible to place safely in the average person’s care.
I got my low-content wolfdog in winter of last year, and last weekend was the first ‘flawless’ one we’ve had together (and by flawless, I simply mean that he didn’t destroy anything, recalled when I gave the command, and quit mouthing on my arms when I signaled that he was getting too rough - by all accounts, he simply did what was expected of him, when it was expected, and I’ve never been happier). But it took us more than half a year to reach this point! I will need to continue keeping up with his training on a daily basis if I expect the lessons to stick. We’ll have good days, and we’ll have bad days. But these little victories are testimony to how far we’ve both come. The only reason I’ve been able to manage Jude is because I’ve had a lot of support from others within the wolfdog community. An uneducated person adopting a shelter-raised wolfdog wouldn’t stand a chance of being able to provide that animal with a healthy, happy life. 

nikkiifool:

lastofthetimeladies:

freshest-tittymilk:

portraits-of-america:

     “I got both of them from local shelters. When I got her in 2006, the staff told me she was a shepherd husky. I go to the dog park, I’m meeting people with shepherd husky mixes, and they look nothing like her. I get in my car, I’m driving, I look in the rearview mirror, I see these eyes and I’m like, I’ve got a wolf in my car. Then, when she was 10-months old, there was a shepherd breeder and trainer in the dog park, and at the end of the lesson, the trainer came up to me and asked, ‘What kind of dog is that?’ And I’m thinking, Shepherd husky. You should know, you are a breeder. She said, ‘That’s a wolf.’” 

Bethlehem, PA

Thats mildly hilarious

what do you think of this naturepunk ?

Already re-blogged this, but it’s apparently making the rounds again. 

This is a classic case of “well, if it doesn’t look exactly like a purebred shepherd/husky is *must* be a wolf!” 

Neither of these animals appear to have any wolf content whatsoever. Their body structure and skull size are doglike; their ears, noses, eyes, and jowls are all dog, too; lastly, their easy nature in a public space is likewise an indication these two pups are “just” dogs.  

Rescuing a wolfdog is not easy - I know this story intimately. Woofers don’t adjust well when separated from the people who raise them, and do not transition nicely into new homes. If not raised around people, in a stable environment, they quickly revert to feral behaviors and are virtually impossible to place safely in the average person’s care.

I got my low-content wolfdog in winter of last year, and last weekend was the first ‘flawless’ one we’ve had together (and by flawless, I simply mean that he didn’t destroy anything, recalled when I gave the command, and quit mouthing on my arms when I signaled that he was getting too rough - by all accounts, he simply did what was expected of him, when it was expected, and I’ve never been happier). But it took us more than half a year to reach this point! I will need to continue keeping up with his training on a daily basis if I expect the lessons to stick. We’ll have good days, and we’ll have bad days. But these little victories are testimony to how far we’ve both come. 

The only reason I’ve been able to manage Jude is because I’ve had a lot of support from others within the wolfdog community. An uneducated person adopting a shelter-raised wolfdog wouldn’t stand a chance of being able to provide that animal with a healthy, happy life. 

wildlifeaid:

The first patient of the day…

A tawny owl was brought in this morning after being found on the side of the road.

He had a broken beak, an ulcer in one of his eye and blood coming from his left ear. On top of it, almost all his tail feathers were gone, except one! We have no idea what happened to him, although it’s most likely to have been an RTA (road traffic accident).

This unlucky chap is looking very weak, but we are doing everything we can to save him.

Please Text WILD3 to 70300 to give a one-off donation of £3.00 towards his care.

The owl says Twit-Twoo! (we think it means ‘thank you’!)

tearun asked
Hi! I was wondering if you know anybody whose knowledgeable about corvids in the UK, as well as about Larsen traps? I've been asked to sign a petition to make it illegal to use corvid/larsen traps in the UK, but I looked into it a bit and I'm not finding a reason why this should be stopped: I can't find any endangered corvids endemic to the UK, or anything inhumane about using larsen traps from what I know. I don't want to sign a petition blindly without research. Help?

I’m not familiar with this issue, but perhaps one of my followers is. 

If you can provide some more information on this topic, please feel free to chime in!