Hi! I'm a taxidermist.
To me, Nature is God. Without it, we simply would not exist. Conserving the world’s natural spaces and the creatures that live there is paramount to the survival of humans as a species, and I have therefore dedicated my life to studying environmentalism in order to help people co-exist more successfully and sustainably with the natural world.

All natural materials I use in my creations are either sourced from roadkill, Fish and Game, secondhand sources such as fellow artists and estate sales, or are antique. In this way, I'm ensuring that no animals were needlessly killed for the sake of the artwork I produce. I fully believe that no part of any creature should go to waste if a purpose can be found for it, but I do NOT support trophy hunters or overseas fur farms by buying 'byproducts' like bones, skulls, or claws directly from them. The only exception I make for this rule is for parts from animals legally culled for population control programs approved by Fish and Wildlife.

As a photographer and wildlife enthusiast, I've been involved with many fantastic organizations such as Images4Life and Wild Tiger, as well as the Sierra Club and many smaller, local groups.
I've been published, interviewed, and even featured on Rainn Wilson (Dwight from “The Office”)'s personal networking website, SoulPancake.com.

I’ve also been blessed with the opportunity to visit many of the world’s most amazing wild places, like Komodo Island, Bali, Lombok, Malaysia, and the Cayman Islands, and have even documented entirely new species previously unknown to science.

Other interests include: Wilderness survival, primitive skills, backpacking, fishing, kayaking, boffing, airsoft, snowboarding, meandering around town, and caving.

 

Verdict from the pros regarding THIS POST

I want to make it clear to everyone, but especially to beeisforblunts, that this is not meant to be any manner of attack on you or your dog. But I think it’s important for you, and others, to know about this issue. 

The breeder Kenobi reportedly comes from, Bill Lambert of Starcross Wolves, is a huge offender for misrepresenting and mistreating his animals. More than 20 of the “wolfdogs” were recently confiscated from the owner, who is said to run a backyard breeding ring, wherein all his animals run freely about, unregulated, on several fenced-in acres. He has supposedly had many of his dogs fight and kill one-another because they are not separated, and does not often know the parents of his animals (this may explain why, as someone already stated, Kenobi does not really resemble his supposed parents).

Reports of inbreeding among his stock are rampant. Health problems have evidently resulted in animal deaths. Neglect has put this breeder under fire from several animal rights groups. He has scammed people out of thousands of dollars, as well.

To beeisforblunts: You yourself said that your pup was very ill when you first obtained him. Whether you got him directly from the breed, or a shelter as you claimed, please read the information in the links above, and take into consideration the opinions of the professional wolfdog breeders on the Facebook post. Your pup is not 88% wolf, and that’s nothing to be ashamed of. You were lied to by a shady, abusive, extortionist backyard breeder who is on virtually every wolfdog enthusiast’s shit list. 

It’s easy to get angry knowing that the animal you have is not, in fact, part wolf. Please direct that anger toward the breeder. Leave comments, share your story, spread this information with others, if you’d like. It may stop more people from supporting Bill Lambert in the future, and that’s a great step in the right direction for the welfare of the dogs.

I can help if have any questions or concerns, or would like more information on the man behind Starcross Wolves. But in the meantime, start making a different by putting a halt to the misrepresentation of your own pup, and love him for what he is - a very beautiful domestic dog. 

wulfdoges:

Caption reads:

"Mother was mostly Wolf with a touch of malamute, father was purebred German shepherd.
Heard some people were looking for a stud of this breed so I though I’d put this out there.
Fee on individual basis

Please no hate mail or lectures, I will simply delete them, only reply if seriously interested
Thank You”

I have an inkling suspicion that this guy KNOWS his dog is not, in fact, “part wolf” at all, but still wants to make a quick buck on Craigslist by breeding his pretty mutt to any uneducated “wolf hybrid” fanatic out there. Bleh. 

Was thinking about this post the other day, and it suddenly dawned on me: This pup is a dead ringer for Diamond, my current foster male. Possibly from the same misrepresenting breeder? I mean, this is just uncanny:

If the animal in the Craigslist post weren’t from a different state, I’d say they’re the same animal. They may be from the same litter? 

beeisforblunts:

Photos of Kenobi as well as photos of his parents.

It’s great that you guys are taking such great care of this animal. But again, I am concerned with the fact that you think he is “88%” wolf, especially after seeing his parents. They appear to be low-content animals at best, and have a LOT of dog traits, which, to most experience wolfdog owners, are very easy to make out: Large sparsely-furred ears, dropped jowls, pronounced stops to their skulls, etc. A true high-content wolfdog will look almost indistinguishable from a pure wild wolf. And Kenobi, like his parents, while beautiful, looks more like a dog than anything else. 

Catlike claws and long legs are not, on their own, wolf traits. And I have no idea what you mean by saying he’s got “extra canine teeth” in your previous post - that sounds like a dental problem more than anything else. 

As for the vet and shelter saying he’s “88% wolf” - vets will always go off what the owners claim, and are generally very bad at identifying breeds (one vet asked if my purebred sable German shepherd was a Belgian malinois). Likewise, there is no official registry for wolfdogs. You can get them “papered” by the Continental Kennel Club, but it’s a well-known fact in the dog world that the CKC is a scam registry often used by backyard breeders who want to *seem* legitimate.  

On the same note, it’s generally considered a taboo by the wolfdog community to describe a wolfdog’s content with either percentage or fractions, as genetics vary greatly. The correct term is “content”. You can read more on that HERE. 

I noted that in your previous post, you also mentioned: 

Also, I know he is not at the size he should be. He went into wolf shock shortly after we got him home. He became so ill that we almost lost him. 

He fought for his life for 2 weeks before finally making a full recovery. During these two weeks he wouldn’t eat or drink. 
This put him behind and caused him to be smaller than your typical wolf.”

I have no idea what “wolf shock” is, but it sounds to me like you’re making excuses at this point. The images I provided in my last post show a very clear difference between Kenobi and actual verified high-content wolfdogs. Likewise, a real high-content wolfdog will almost certainly require special containment solutions (I see that all you have is a wooden privacy fence), private property on which to roam, and specialized veterinary care (and if your vet thinks that he’s “88%” wolf, they are clearly not well-versed in wolfdog applications). 

But, for good measure, I’d like to share this post with some other folks in the wolfdog community. non-wolfdogs and yourdogisnotawolf will likely be able to give some additional information, and I’d like to share this with the Real Wolfdog Facebook page. Someone might recognize the lines the parents came from, as they do look to have *some* wolf content (but again - not much), to give you a bit more insight. 

If you have any other questions, feel free to ask! 

alexiskayehux:

naturepunk:

This is a ‘blind’ wolf headdress I created for a customer. It was a fun wolf to work with and has some of the most beautiful markings I’ve ever seen on a black/silver specimen.

The issue, though, is that the customer has not paid for this commission, and I have not been able to reach them in over a year. I held on to it, hoping that maybe they’d get back to me eventually, but I’m done waiting.

I need the money. My truck’s break system is literally screaming for repairs, I have some hunting gear to pay off, and a bunch of art projects that I need to finish but which I’m unable to work on until I get more supplies.

So I’m selling this wolf to the first person who wants it. Asking supply and labor cost only. I’m not trying to make a profit on this. I just want my money back so I can my life and business back into sway. $960.00 shipped. 

You sir or ma’am are disgusting for hurting such beautiful creatures.

May you rot in hell :)

Except I didn’t hurt this animal in any way, shape, or form. It was long dead when I got it. Previously, the pelt had been owned by an acquaintance of mine who was raising funds for his local Native youth center. It had been in his family for generations prior to that.

The money I spent on this pelt did not support any trophy hunters or anything of that ilk; on the contrary, I was promised that it would help fund the creation of a mural for the center’s dining hall.

So I’d greatly appreciate it if you could, in the future, either keep your ignorance to yourself, or simply ask questions before jumping to conclusions about my work. 

simple-indigo-child asked
Hey! Just wondering how I would work with my Great Pyrenees. He's really starting to anger me. I have to give him ear drops but they hurt his ears and then he won't come to me when I call him. Not for food, not for me to apologize. Not for love or money! And he does this normally, if I call and he's not in the mood for moving he won't. What do I do?

For him, administration of the ear drops is obviously a bad experience, and one he will continue to avoid unless something is done to make him think it’s not *all* negative. 

The best way to remedy the situation is to make the ear drops a positive experience. This can be hard to do, but using some really good treats before, during, and after medication time is a great start. I know some dogs are not typically food motivated with normal treats (this seems to be the case with your pup), so I’d recommend shelling out something extraordinary for them during this time, just to make the occasion extra special.

For my pups, “special occasion treats” means one of two things: dehydrated lamb lung ($25.00 for a 1-pound bag at any pet store), or rabbit liver ($0.25 per pound from my local butcher, but hard to find elsewhere).

You can also get treats that come in paste form, so that your dog has something to work at and be distracted by while you administer the medication. At the vet’s, we use paste treats to distract Jude when he gets vaccinations and it’s a night and day difference. If he doesn’t have the treat distraction, it becomes a three-person job just to hold him down while the vet gives him the injection. 

Hopefully this helps! 

This is a ‘blind’ wolf headdress I created for a customer. It was a fun wolf to work with and has some of the most beautiful markings I’ve ever seen on a black/silver specimen.

The issue, though, is that the customer has not paid for this commission, and I have not been able to reach them in over a year. I held on to it, hoping that maybe they’d get back to me eventually, but I’m done waiting.

I need the money. My truck’s break system is literally screaming for repairs, I have some hunting gear to pay off, and a bunch of art projects that I need to finish but which I’m unable to work on until I get more supplies.

So I’m selling this wolf to the first person who wants it. Asking supply and labor cost only. I’m not trying to make a profit on this. I just want my money back so I can my life and business back into sway. $960.00 shipped. 

beeisforblunts:

Cub love

Beautiful dog! I see that you’ve tagged this with “wolf” “wolf cub” and “88%”, though. Do you mean to say that this animal is 88% wolf? Because this is what a high-content wolfdog pup of the same general age as yours looks like: 




And this is what a young husky mix pup looks like: 



Hopefully, the differences between high-content wolfdogs and the husky/malamute mixes are clear to see. Your pup looks strikingly similar to the latter.
And it’s nothing to be ashamed about. LOTS of people say that their husky/malamute/German shepherd mixes are “part wolf” when they actually aren’t, which gives others the wrong impression about how real wolfdogs look and act. 
The issue, though, is that real wolfdogs are illegal in many states and counties. And by claiming that your domestic dog is “part wolf” you are giving up your legal right to defend your animal’s life in the event that the authorities deem it unsafe, a public nuisance, or just happen to dislike wolfdogs. In some states, like PA, any dog claimed to be a wolfdog can be confiscated from its owner and put down simply because the owner labeled that animal as a wolfdog, even if it’s professionally phenotyped as having no wolf content.
Unlike domestic dogs, wolfdogs are not approved for rabies vaccines, even though the vaccinations do work on them. This means that all high-content wolfdogs are at risk, and are not given the same legal protections as domestic dogs in the event of a bite on a person or other animal. It will be put down. Please understand that while it may seem cool to have a wolfdog, these animals actually require very specialized care and understanding. Claiming that your animal is “88% wolf” is not only dangerous to him, but also to numerous other husky/malamute mixes which look like him. You can read more on that topic HERE. 

beeisforblunts:

Cub love

Beautiful dog! I see that you’ve tagged this with “wolf” “wolf cub” and “88%”, though. Do you mean to say that this animal is 88% wolf? Because this is what a high-content wolfdog pup of the same general age as yours looks like: 

And this is what a young husky mix pup looks like: 

Hopefully, the differences between high-content wolfdogs and the husky/malamute mixes are clear to see. Your pup looks strikingly similar to the latter.

And it’s nothing to be ashamed about. LOTS of people say that their husky/malamute/German shepherd mixes are “part wolf” when they actually aren’t, which gives others the wrong impression about how real wolfdogs look and act. 

The issue, though, is that real wolfdogs are illegal in many states and counties. And by claiming that your domestic dog is “part wolf” you are giving up your legal right to defend your animal’s life in the event that the authorities deem it unsafe, a public nuisance, or just happen to dislike wolfdogs. In some states, like PA, any dog claimed to be a wolfdog can be confiscated from its owner and put down simply because the owner labeled that animal as a wolfdog, even if it’s professionally phenotyped as having no wolf content.

Unlike domestic dogs, wolfdogs are not approved for rabies vaccines, even though the vaccinations do work on them. This means that all high-content wolfdogs are at risk, and are not given the same legal protections as domestic dogs in the event of a bite on a person or other animal. It will be put down. 

Please understand that while it may seem cool to have a wolfdog, these animals actually require very specialized care and understanding. Claiming that your animal is “88% wolf” is not only dangerous to him, but also to numerous other husky/malamute mixes which look like him. You can read more on that topic HERE

Assholes on a Plane

Rewind to 14-year-old Naturepunk. I traveled a lot back in those days, and was on a flight to England at the time. I was seated next to a young man in a business suit, who seemed disgruntled with me right off the bat when I, having flown on numerous international flights before, was the first of the two of us to lean my seat back, kick up my feet, and stick my elbow on the single arm rest between us. I had, up to that point, figured that determining rights to the arm rest was just an unwritten airplane code: First come, first served. 

I don’t know when exactly it happened. But slowly, I became aware of the fact that this young businessman had propped his own elbow right up on the rest against mine. I thought, “okay, we can share. I’m a nice person and you seem like one too, so this is acceptable even though I was here first.” 

I gave the dude another inch of space, and went back to reading my book. 

Eventually, I become aware of the fact that this man, an adult professional in a fancy business suit, is now pushing subtly on my elbow with his own arm. He is trying to get me to relinquish the arm rest to him.

So, being a rebellious teenager, I refused to move, digging my elbow in to the seat back, thinking, “Yo, I’ve given you half the arm rest already, and if that’s not enough for you, I’m sorry, but you’re SOL”.

As soon as I refused to give in to this man’s subtle attempt to steal the arm rest, he started to push my elbow with a renewed force. 

I was a little surprised. He wasn’t being subtle about it now, but remained reading his newspaper as if nothing were out of the ordinary. The next thing I know, the two of us are both locking our arms against one-another in a silent battle of both physical and mental wills for dominion of the sacred arm rest. 

Thankfully, the businessman was not very strong. And I, for my size, most certainly was. I gave him a hard time, to the point that, after a few minutes of constant pushing, he had to stop for a break before continuing again. This happened three more times. 

Finally, growing tired of this childish game myself, I turned to the man and simply said, in my most polite and feminine voice, “If you’ve had enough, we can go back to sharing the arm rest now.”

He blinked hard at me, as if to say, “I have no idea what you’re talking about! I wasn’t doing anything!” but he did immediately stop pushing and let out a soft sigh of what I assume was relief. We shared the arm rest for a moment more before he got up to use the bathroom, and when he returned, went on to pretend that the arm rest between did not exist anymore.

This guy, a grown man, not only felt entitled to the arm rest I shared with him, but refused to quit pushing his point (yay, puns!) up until the moment when I called him out on it. Thereafter, he seemed embarrassed by the fact that he’d ‘lost’ his ‘right’ to the entire arm rest, so refused to acknowledge it any further.